GIMP

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GIMP

Post  davey on Mon Jun 21, 2010 12:49 pm

Ken hows the Goldmaxx Power doing, does it like our clean soil and is it deep Smile

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Re: GIMP

Post  ken on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:00 pm

its too bloody sensitive Crying or Very sad so I'm still playing around Wink with it

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Re: GIMP

Post  davey on Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:39 pm

Tips & Hints on Goldmaxx Power

Firstly, let me congratulate you on choosing the Goldmaxx Power, you have joined the ever-growing band of XP detector users. I detect and field test machines full-time and being independent I owe my allegiance to no manufacturer, but after testing the XP range they made such an impression, that I now use them myself. John Lynn (Norfolk Wolf)

You will be able to go out with the Goldmaxx Power and start finding straight away, these tips and hints are for you to understand the detector better and so will increase those finds.
So let’s take a closer look at the controls individually then as a whole. The first thing to stress is that ALL the controls work in conjunction with each other, by changing a setting on one will have an impact on another and this will have a bearing on the overall effectiveness of the detector’s performance.
Firstly the Iron Threshold. What does it mean and what does it actually do and why the Auto position. Think of this as two discrimination systems, The Auto has been set at such a position as to ignore metals that have a conductivity up to and including that of “coke” (unburnt coal),as this had proved to be a problem for some people in the past when using the previous Goldmaxx. However for those who don’t encounter this problem, by switching out of auto the discrimination starts working from giving no signal on tiny pieces of iron right through to the larger sizes and shapes of it. Unlike other detectors, the cut-off for discrimination at maximum is no higher than large iron. We all dig any signal other than iron anyway, so why have it higher? Another factor that comes into the equation is the lower the discrimination, the faster the recovery speed**. If you were to turn the Iron Threshold up to maximum and use it at that setting all the time in the thinking, ”right I don’t want to be bothered by that useless stuff”, you would be wrong. The reason being, that by doing this you could mask out a good signal that is close by to a small nail. Set the Iron threshold to size of the iron that you are encountering under the coil, so if it is just small nails, use it at a low setting. Larger iron? Then increase the setting, remember “the lower the practical setting, the better”.
**Recovery speed? This is the time it takes a detector to recover from one metal object’s signal to give a positive response to the next. To explain this a bit more fully. When going over an unwanted object (iron nail etc) the quicker the detector recovers from this signal the less distance is needed to find the next signal so this gives you more chance of finding a good one (coin) near to it. In owning the Goldmaxx Power you have the detector with the fastest recovery (by far) that I have ever tested.

Silencer, this has a more than one attribute.
Regard this as an incremental discrimination system when on the lowest settings of the iron threshold (not auto) for tiny iron, nails etc (Nail Reject). Position 0 will have a small amount of discrimination, small nails will “spit” or give a broken signal. This position will have the best recovery speed. So why not stay on 0 all the time? Well, as I said, 0 partially discriminates against small nails. By changing to 1 helps to discriminate against the small iron a little more with less sound breaking through, then obviously 2 goes even further to discriminate the small nail even more, so there will be no sound. Hence the name, Silencer. Obviously with the high level of Disc. in Auto you won’t be aware of it’s discrimination effects, the same applies on the higher levels when out of Auto; but in both instances the recovery speed is increased when in “1” and even more so when in”0”. However if the area you are working doesn’t contain a large proliferation of iron and therefore no need to have a fast recovery speed, use the “2” setting as this will improve the separation between the tones.
The other use of the silencer is that by flicking from “1” to “2” twice within a couple of seconds, the tones will change from the default setting of three to two. However be aware that when employing two tones and you come out of Auto Iron Threshold this then becomes a single tone. I don’t recommend this practice when you are first learning the machine. To return to three tones the detector needs to be switched off then on again.

Iron Volume. (The unsung hero of the machine)
This control gives what I can only describe as a low buzz to iron (and coke when in Auto); the higher it is turned, the louder the volume and the better it works on the bigger stuff such as horseshoes etc. Why do we need it? Well think about it for a minute, if everything was quiet as you were detecting, how would you know what is under the coil? Because the iron volume will be “buzzing out” on iron and coke, this will enable you to sweep the coil at the correct speed thereby allowing the recovery speed of the Power to work at it’s most efficient. “Iffy signals”? Correct use of the Iron volume will cut these to a minimum. One very important tip. The front edge of the coil isn’t as sensitive as the rest of it, use the front edge over non-definite signals, this will increase the effectiveness of the iron volume. Try running a large nail or bit of iron over the centre of the coil and then over the leading edge; you will see how much more that this improves the “buzz”. What you can also try out at home with the larger pieces of iron, is to run it across the coil with the iron volume off; it will give a low note, now gradually move it further away, the note changes to a higher pitch whilst still remaining loud. The further away from the coil, the more it begins sounding like a coin. Turn on the iron volume, this will “growl” over iron, the larger and also the deeper the iron, the more the control needs to be turned to the right. Even so, some large pieces will still come through when beyond the depth of the Iron Volume. This will be all part of the learning curve, the larger pieces will give a louder than normal signal and a mixture of tones, which to begin with can be confusing. Any signals you receive like this you will soon learn to leave them. If you do decide to dig them take out the first shove-full of soil and then turn the Iron volume on full and run the coil over and in the hole, if it is deep large iron it will then give the “buzz”.
Keep it slow to let you know!

At home try testing the silencer in conjunction with the iron threshold just out of Auto by using different sizes of old rusty nails and bits of iron. Listen to the responses from the different shapes and sizes. Now increase the iron threshold settings further and further to the right. Finally try it in auto. Depending on the size and depth, as the search head travels across larger and larger nails or pieces of iron, these will give a broken signal, and eventually come through the discrimination and sound out. The larger the size of iron the further away to one side the coil will need to be from it, to pick up a good target. This is called Target Masking. This just means the effect that discriminated iron has near a good target; (a coin) this prevents the good target from registering. When detecting and your getting a few iron signals, it’s a good idea to “see in your minds eye” the iron you’ve just gone over, assess the size by the type of signal; then remember about the iron masking the signal and the detector needing more time to recover. The way to help the detector work to the best of its ability is to sweep slowly in these “naily” areas, give the machine time to recover from a bad signal. Most people regard nails and iron as a nuisance, and can’t wait to get out of the area and speed up. As you have just read, this is exactly the opposite of what is required. Iron and nails are a likely sign of habitation, which means finds. Regard them not as a nuisance but more as a problem, which now you can overcome. N.B. For best results in “naily areas” reduce sensitivity back to “10o’clock” (even further if necessary) and work slowly, depth does not come into the equation in areas such as these. By doing this, it will actually “help” the detector. The worse the situation, the less the need of sensitivity.
At home run a coin over the coil at the preset sensitivity mark, notice the depth. In stages reduce sensitivity and check the loss of depth, until finally it is on the lowest sensitivity possible. Surprising isn’t it? This will give you the confidence for naily areas.

Practice with it at home.

Ground Reject As there is no threshold, the ground balance system on the
Goldmaxx is different than that of other detectors. Instead of “balancing” the ground, it
employs a system that rejects it.
What does it really mean and why do we need it? The ground (soil) contains varying amounts of negative iron oxides, and it’s a means of rejecting these mineral signals in the ground so that they won’t affect the detectors ability to find metallic objects. If we start where the ground reject is set correctly, any movement of the control will be either to the left, (picking up the ground minerals) or right, (moving further away from the effects of the ground minerals.) But the detector has already been ground balanced when I switched it on and held it in the air for five or more seconds? That’s not quite right, not to go into too great depth, it is measuring the resistive and inductive components of the coil and generally “setting up the detector”. Ground Reject allows the more advanced user to “fine tune” the detector for his particular piece of ground. For the first few weeks set the control on the preset mark as this will also knock out troublesome hot rocks**, the detector will be more stable and also giving better discrimination. This will be of real help, for you to begin understanding the detector and how it works. Do not be in a rush to go beyond this stage. Understanding is everything, this machine has the capabilities to put a great deal of finds in your pocket, you will be the one to stop that happening, not the machine. Eventually as you progress, you will want to try the Ground Reject. As a general rule have it set to where the red segment first begins on the control, (about 11o’clock), too far left for the ground conditions and the detector becomes unstable, false signals occurring (chattering), discrimination will be effected, , and target separation disintegrates (Frightening). Considering that this detector is deep to begin with, the quest for that little bit more depth has too much against it,
** Hot rocks what are they? It’s normally a small rock that is different in its mineralisation than that of the surrounding ground. These can cause the detector to sound off. To reject these is straightforward enough. Obtain the hot rock when detecting, run the hot rock backwards and forwards over the coil whilst turning the Ground reject slowly to the right, until the signal disappears. That’s it! These are not to be confused with “coke”, hot rocks are mineralised= ground reject, “coke” is conductive= Auto Iron threshold.
N.B. If you are using the ground balance on the preset mark and the detector starts giving false signals or behaving a bit more erratic from the norm, check that you haven’t moved the ground balance, if not, then reduce the sensitivity, you’re either over a lot of iron or ashes! (Other situations are given in the back of the manual.)

Sensitivity.
Be very cautious with this control, the added power can catch out the unwary, instead of the expected increase in depth; too much use of this control will actually diminish it!!
I would suggest that for the first few weeks until you are really familiar with the Power that you only have the Sensitivity set at about 12-1o’clock. Any higher over certain ground conditions and you will be giving yourself a lot of head-aches in trying to understand the machine. Even at this setting you will find that there is about the same amount of depth capabilities as the old Goldmaxx on preset. (Try it out at home with a hammered coin at preset then gradually turn the sensitivity back to just on). As I said earlier with settings for the ground reject, don’t be in a rush to go beyond this stage.
However when you become more accustomed to the detector you will eventually want to go beyond the last statement. To get the best out of the detector it first needs to be set to the ground conditions before attempting to increase the sensitivity.
One more point, do not be afraid to use lower settings than those I recommend especially over “naily” or bad ground. On certain sites of mine I have had the sensitivity only barely switched on as this was the only way that I could find the good items from amongst the nails. Having the sensitivity any higher defeated the object; I was actually getting less depth and more of ear-bashing from unwanted signals that masked the good ones.

Frequency and channel shift. I don’t think there is anything I can add as this has been covered quite adequately in the manual,

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Re: GIMP

Post  ken on Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:40 pm

I Like the silver side of the GMP Cool it definitley likes silver,a William fourth shilling in the week and a Victorian 1842 fourpence tonight on a field I've detected dozens of times, along with about a dozen scrap liards and double tournois, nothing legible as normal, but not a lot of depth from it, the deepest signel so far the fourpence at around 4" deep, but nice signel telling me to dig it, much better than the sounds for copper or bronze. Cool
Its possible that the lack of depth is being caused by the ground being too dry or fluffy from rotavating Question
I do love the cordless headphones they are the bigest plus point for me, no more tangled wires nor broken plug jacks, and so far about 6 weeks between charging. about 5 or 6 trips out. I've
not changed the batteries in the detector yet either. Like a Star @ heaven Like a Star @ heaven

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Re: GIMP

Post  ken on Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:45 pm

found my first gold ring with the GMP tonight, Very Happy nice loud signel even though it was only a wedding band, very promising Very Happy

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Re: GIMP

Post  davey on Sat Aug 28, 2010 9:18 pm

Ken if you need to go deeper any time with the gmp then I have a 11" coil you can borrow just give me a buzz Smile

Still got the 9" also

now just deciding wether to get ws1's or ws3's Smile

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Re: GIMP

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